Archive for the 'food retailing' Category

Are “food halls” an answer for mall vacancies?

One of the biggest issues confronting mall developers is how to fill empty space (especially from vacant anchors). There just aren’t enough brick-and-mortar retailers to fill that space without coming up with some original ideas. One recent discussion on RetailWire focuses on the concept of “food halls” as a possible answer:

Anybody who has traveled the world (and has visited department stores in the process) can’t help but be dazzled by the food halls, especially in Europe but also in Asia and elsewhere. I realize that this is an extension of “high street” shopping in densely populated central business districts, so it doesn’t necessarily lend itself to the American department store model. And yet…wouldn’t a food hall (in the European sense) be more compelling than a Backstage installation in a Macy’s store?

The growth in self-contained food halls inside malls (but not necessarily inside a department store) is healthy for several reasons — and not just as a placeholder for another anchor tenant. It capitalizes on shoppers’ growing interest in cooking, healthy eating, locavore dining, etc. — and it provides an opportunity for retailers like Whole Foods/365 or Trader Joe’s to expand their footprint. Besides, if you’re waiting for one department store to fill the anchor space of another…you’re going to have a long wait.

Case in point (from another recent post):

“Signs of the apocalypse” are rampant in some segments, such as traditional mall anchors, but overstated in other high-growth areas like off-pricers. As regional malls suffer one tenant loss after another, it’s hard to see how all of those giant locations are going to be filled — especially if the anchors were in B and C malls to begin with.

One example, in my home market of Milwaukee, is the exit of Sears (three locations) followed by last week’s announced liquidation of Bon-Ton Stores. Boston Store (the local Bon-Ton nameplate) had five locations here — including two stores with over 200,000 square feet. If you’re a mall developer losing two of three anchors, it’s easy to feel like you have a black cloud hanging over your head.

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Is Aldi moving “uptown” too fast?

Here’s a recent comment from RetailWire about Aldi, and its decision to open more stores in upscale suburbs and neighborhoods. I think it’s a smart idea:

Many of the original Aldi locations (at least here in the Milwaukee area) were in lower income neighborhoods often suffering from “food desert” syndrome. The stores filled an important niche, but eventually Aldi started growing into middle-income and more upscale suburbs here. I’m sure the same phenomenon has happened around the country. If Aldi is serious about upgrading its merchandise content, the store experience has to keep pace.

Again, a local parallel: Pick ‘n Save stores (first part of Roundy’s, now a Kroger division) began as bare-bones stores with food displayed in cut-open shipping cartons stacked on empty gondolas. The formula worked for awhile (Pick ‘n Save became the market share leader here) but eventually customers expected a better experience. The same is true of outlet malls — from “piperack” operations to very upscale today.

So Aldi is making the smart move, especially where the trade-area demographics dictate, as long as they don’t simply duplicate their Trader Joe’s formula.

Online grocery sales gaining share quickly

It should come as no surprise (except, perhaps, to traditional grocery chains) that online sales are the fastest growing segment of the industry. Today’s RetailWire panel reflects on whether the major players are ready for this trend. Here’s my opinion:

The wave of online sales that has swamped general merchandising is now catching up to the grocery industry. This shouldn’t come as a surprise to food retailers after watching other industry segments caught flat-footed. It’s only now that general merchandisers have developed omnichannel strategies that are helping them turn a corner.

The key for grocery retailers is to reach the customer where he or she wants to shop. This may mean home delivery or it may mean BOPIS — and it may also mean a simpler shopping experience in-store with less overassortment to choose from. Rest assured that Amazon is going to deliver a more convenient experience (with higher in-stock levels) while traditional food retailers are still trying to figure out if there is a threat.

Amazon Go…it’s a go!

After a long period of testing, Amazon Go is finally opening its doors to the public. Its first C-store location in Seattle has already received a lot of attention for its technological leap, where the shopper can walk out the door and pay for purchases without stopping at a register. Here’s my comment on RetailWire:

I assume the long gestation period was needed to test not only the technology but also the merchandise content. From the descriptions of Amazon Go, it is more focused on fresh and ready-to-eat food than a typical C-store and devotes less space to categories like candy, chips and so forth. It will be interesting to read some on-the-ground reporting about what the store actually looks and feels like.

I expect Amazon to be patient with the concept, because some customers simply won’t be comfortable right away with a cashier-less environment. At least for now, human interaction in any kind of store (including a C-store) is part of the equation unless you’re an early adapter of the Amazon Go tech experience.

What’s the biggest obstacle to online grocery delivery?

My short answer (see RetailWire comment below): Execution!

If my experience (recounted on earlier posts) is any guide, too many shoppers have tried online grocery delivery with inconsistent results. It doesn’t inspire confidence when your delivery is two hours late and 33% short — and you’re on hold for 45 minutes trying to resolve the problem or cancel the order. (I’m talking about you, Safeway.)

There is no way for conventional grocers to grow their mature business without figuring out how to execute better. The customer has been trained to expect on-time delivery of complete orders in every other category, and Amazon is going to put pressure on its competitors as it expands the Whole Foods footprint.

About that “whole paycheck” perception…

Some of my earlier comments about the Amazon-Whole Foods deal touch on the expected benefits of better e-commerce execution and predictive data science. But let’s not forget that Whole Foods has a price perception problem that Amazon needs to fix. Here’s a recent comment from RetailWire:

I teach a college-level class in retail management. When I surveyed the class about where they shopped, most answered Aldi, or Trader Joe’s, or Metro Market (the Milwaukee brand of Kroger-owned Mariano’s). None of them shops at Whole Foods even though the store is in the neighborhood where most of them live.

There is no doubt that Whole Foods’ “premium price” reputation has kept many shoppers away, as they face more competition in the “organic” arena. I believe the first round of price cuts is just the start, and it simply moved some overpriced key items to the “market price.” Expect more of this from Amazon in the future, but also expect Amazon to build Whole Foods’ base on its potential e-commerce and home delivery upsides.

Amazon pushes Whole Foods toward centralization

There has been plenty of comment — most of it critical — about Amazon’s intention to centralize its merchandising of the Whole Foods stores. Most of the critics are concerned that the lack of local brand advocacy will turn Whole Foods into something very different. Here’s my RetailWire comment on that topic, followed by a comment about what Kroger is doing in response:

Centralized buying will bring economies of scale that allow Whole Foods to compete more effectively on price and on execution. But competitors (Kroger, I believe, is one example) are already opening the door to local vendors in response to the Whole Foods move.

Let’s not forget, however, that Amazon is the master of data science when it comes to retail management. Just because they are tightening the screws on the buying process doesn’t mean that they will ignore local preferences. In fact, they are likely to do a better job of allocating space and replenishing goods to meet individual stores’ tastes than Whole Foods ever dreamed of.

And now my comment about Kroger’s announcement that it is encouraging more local vendors:

Whether this was a pre-existing strategy or a reaction to the Whole Foods “centralization” news, it’s a good idea especially for grocers with national scale to pay attention to local preferences. As I said last week, however, don’t assume that Amazon will ignore this issue just because it is trying to find cost savings in the Whole Foods model in order to compete.

Amazon is the leader in using data science to determine consumer preferences, and I expect this to extend to their assortment planning in individual Whole Foods stores. If Kroger intends to compete, it will want to support its “local” initiative with great execution of in-stock levels.

 


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