Archive for the 'E-commerce' Category

Is Amazon Prime Wardrobe another disruptive move?

Amazon is introducing a new feature for Prime members: Risk-free trial of several apparel items with the ability to return what you don’t like. (And price incentives to keep more of what you chose.) RetailWire panelists mostly see this as another Amazon “game changer,” but I view it a bit differently as their response to the lack of physical stores:

If Amazon aspires to be the top seller of apparel in the U.S. (and it’s already getting close), it needs to add a “try before you buy” feature to keep driving more Prime memberships. It’s responding to the challenge of concepts like Trunk Club — but it’s also acknowledging its lack of a physical footprint. Think about it — stores like Kohl’s and Macy’s already have huge numbers of brick-and-mortar locations where you can return unwanted clothing that you bought online. This may be a rare case where Amazon responds to a competitive weakness in its formula.

Why did Walmart acquire Bonobos?

In case you missed it (among the front-page coverage of Amazon and Whole Foods), Walmart acquired men’s online retailer Bonobos last week. RetailWire panelists weighed in on the pluses and minuses of the move, and here’s my take:

The news about Walmart and Bonobos was overshadowed by the Amazon headline on Friday, and understandably so because of the sheer scope and boldness of the Whole Foods acquisition. But Walmart’s news deserves some attention on its own.

This is another case where Walmart is buying a brand that offers more digital expertise and product development skill than the company appears able to build on its own. But there is a disconnect between Walmart’s brand image and the customers who are shopping Bonobos today. Chances are good that the majority of Whole Foods customers are already Amazon Prime members too. How much overlap exists between Bonobos and Walmart, and will the association with Walmart chase away Bonobos’s most loyal consumers?

On Amazon’s bid for Whole Foods

Talk about breaking news: RetailWire panelists had a chance today to weigh in on the announcement of Amazon’s bid to acquire Whole Foods. While many panelists see it as a way for Amazon to gain a bigger toehold in brick-and-mortar retail, I view it differently:

First, the move can help grow Amazon’s brick-and-mortar footprint, but it’s more about taking the Whole Foods brand to every household in America that may order groceries from Amazon. It gives Amazon’s fresh food businesses (meat, produce, organics) instant credibility in homes without a Whole Foods location in sight.

As to the skeptics about whether Amazon can handle the logistics — can they deliver organic produce and Cheerios at the same time — this is the smartest logistics management company in the world that we’re talking about.

Finally, Amazon has a longstanding willingness to lose money in a new business where it is trying to grow market share. The days of “Whole Paycheck” may be over.

Does “free shipping” have to be a money pit?

A quick comment from RetailWire about free shipping and whether it is destined to be a money-losing proposition for most retailers:

Retailers have competed over e-commerce free shipping for a number of years, so it’s hard to envision the genie being put back into the bottle. (Customer expectations are hard to unwind, after all, when they are given a benefit for free.) The trick that Amazon seems to be mastering is the trade-off between speed and cost. Even Prime members may pay extra for same-day or next-day delivery compared to truly free shipping for an item showing up in two days; the shoppers figure out the value equation that matters to them. But will competing retailers take advantage of the solution that Amazon is providing to them?

Why would IKEA sell its goods on Amazon?

RetailWire panelists engaged in some speculation that IKEA may begin expanding its e-commerce footprint, including selling some of its products on the Amazon Marketplace. Here’s my rationale for the possible decision:

IKEA continues to open physical stores at a very deliberate pace. Here in the Milwaukee area, they are finally breaking ground this month for a store announced last year and opening in 2018 — their first in the market. Yet IKEA has broad name recognition and brand equity among potential customers who don’t live anywhere near one of their stores. Why not expand their e-commerce footprint, especially if the sales data uncovers potential new markets or localized changes in merchandise mix?

Operations management needs a seat at the omnichannel table

Today’s RetailWire discussion focuses on the operating pressures caused by omnichannel and digital initiatives. Field managers absolutely need to be part of the planning process, and here’s my point of view:

Retailers pushing for omnichannel solutions (BOPIS, ship-from-store and so forth) absolutely have to involve store operations. There is no way to plan the costs of these services (especially in payroll hours) without field management at the table. And store management has a responsibility to speak up when pushed to “do more with less” — otherwise the costs of omnichannel programs erode the customer service that brick-and-mortar shoppers still expect.

Another frontier for Amazon to cross?

Amazon is reportedly scaling up its infrastructure in order to tackle the major appliance and furniture markets. Panelists weighed in on RetailWire about the challenges and opportunities, and I see the upside:

I commented a couple of weeks ago that Amazon had not yet made big inroads into the major appliance market — but obviously they are headed in this direction, along with furniture. To some degree IKEA has already figured out how to generate furniture sales not tied to its showrooms, so it’s clearly an opportunity for Amazon too. No doubt that they will figure out the logistics of bulky products but this still seems like a business where customers want to “kick the tires” — so perhaps Amazon ought to test showrooms in their early test markets.