Archive for the 'E-commerce' Category

And now, a Google/Walmart tie-up

To expand on my last post (about Kohl’s and Amazon), now comes word of a stronger alliance between Walmart and Google. Here’s my comment from RetailWire, in which I comment that each company brings specific strengths and weaknesses to the partnership:

When the majority of product searches start at Amazon, that’s a huge advantage — it combines the predictive intelligence of an SEO company with the execution skill of a best-in-class e-tailer. But is Amazon invulnerable? Of course not, and that’s part of the reason why the company is filling in its portfolio with brick-and-mortar acquisitions (Whole Foods) or alliances (Kohl’s).

So an expanded partnership between Walmart and Google has potential: It provides Walmart with more robust search capacity and web traffic, and it offers Google a stronger e-commerce platform. But unless Walmart adds more second-party retailers (and their goods) to its site, it’s not going to catch up to Amazon’s head start for awhile.

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Another Amazon/Kohl’s tie-up

To follow up on my comment on “smart home” shops at Kohl’s, now comes word that Kohl’s will test Amazon processing locations (pickup and return) in several markets. I agree with most fellow RetailWire panelists that it will drive traffic to Kohl’s but is an even better deal for Amazon as it fills in its physical footprint:

Omnichannel initiatives like BOPIS already put strain on existing store operations, as panelists just discussed in the context of holiday hiring. So Kohl’s ability to process Amazon returns (even unpackaged ones) without affecting their other operating standards will be something to watch. Without payroll support from Amazon, this could be a heavy lift.

As to who comes out ahead in this collaboration, I understand that this will drive even more traffic to Kohl’s stores. (And my usual disclosure that I worked there from 1982 to 2006.) But Amazon picks up as many as 1100 more brick-and-mortar locations (if it rolls chainwide), with the eventual ability to add pickup lockers and even an ordering kiosk if they play their cards right. So it looks like Amazon is the biggest potential winner in this deal.

Can Amazon execute grocery delivery better than the competition?

A lot of the conversation about the Whole Foods acquisition centers on Amazon acquiring a bigger brick-and-mortar footprint. My RetailWire comment suggests that Amazon also has a chance to take home delivery of groceries to a higher level:

I think Amazon has the chance to bring a level of execution to online grocery shopping that doesn’t appear to be in place yet. I don’t want to judge an entire industry from my experience with Safeway last week, but it may be typical. While on vacation, I ordered groceries to stock up our rental house for a week. The order did not show up in the scheduled delivery window (in fact, Safeway was running 3 hours behind and I canceled the order) and would have been 1/3 short-shipped. What I thought would be a convenience turned out to be a customer service nightmare, after spending nearly an hour on hold to fix the problem.

Again, it’s a small sample size but the combination of stock-outs and late delivery is not exactly meant to inspire confidence in the process. I believe Amazon has the capacity to make this work, and they won’t roll it out aggressively until they are ready.

Is Amazon Prime Wardrobe another disruptive move?

Amazon is introducing a new feature for Prime members: Risk-free trial of several apparel items with the ability to return what you don’t like. (And price incentives to keep more of what you chose.) RetailWire panelists mostly see this as another Amazon “game changer,” but I view it a bit differently as their response to the lack of physical stores:

If Amazon aspires to be the top seller of apparel in the U.S. (and it’s already getting close), it needs to add a “try before you buy” feature to keep driving more Prime memberships. It’s responding to the challenge of concepts like Trunk Club — but it’s also acknowledging its lack of a physical footprint. Think about it — stores like Kohl’s and Macy’s already have huge numbers of brick-and-mortar locations where you can return unwanted clothing that you bought online. This may be a rare case where Amazon responds to a competitive weakness in its formula.

Why did Walmart acquire Bonobos?

In case you missed it (among the front-page coverage of Amazon and Whole Foods), Walmart acquired men’s online retailer Bonobos last week. RetailWire panelists weighed in on the pluses and minuses of the move, and here’s my take:

The news about Walmart and Bonobos was overshadowed by the Amazon headline on Friday, and understandably so because of the sheer scope and boldness of the Whole Foods acquisition. But Walmart’s news deserves some attention on its own.

This is another case where Walmart is buying a brand that offers more digital expertise and product development skill than the company appears able to build on its own. But there is a disconnect between Walmart’s brand image and the customers who are shopping Bonobos today. Chances are good that the majority of Whole Foods customers are already Amazon Prime members too. How much overlap exists between Bonobos and Walmart, and will the association with Walmart chase away Bonobos’s most loyal consumers?

On Amazon’s bid for Whole Foods

Talk about breaking news: RetailWire panelists had a chance today to weigh in on the announcement of Amazon’s bid to acquire Whole Foods. While many panelists see it as a way for Amazon to gain a bigger toehold in brick-and-mortar retail, I view it differently:

First, the move can help grow Amazon’s brick-and-mortar footprint, but it’s more about taking the Whole Foods brand to every household in America that may order groceries from Amazon. It gives Amazon’s fresh food businesses (meat, produce, organics) instant credibility in homes without a Whole Foods location in sight.

As to the skeptics about whether Amazon can handle the logistics — can they deliver organic produce and Cheerios at the same time — this is the smartest logistics management company in the world that we’re talking about.

Finally, Amazon has a longstanding willingness to lose money in a new business where it is trying to grow market share. The days of “Whole Paycheck” may be over.

Does “free shipping” have to be a money pit?

A quick comment from RetailWire about free shipping and whether it is destined to be a money-losing proposition for most retailers:

Retailers have competed over e-commerce free shipping for a number of years, so it’s hard to envision the genie being put back into the bottle. (Customer expectations are hard to unwind, after all, when they are given a benefit for free.) The trick that Amazon seems to be mastering is the trade-off between speed and cost. Even Prime members may pay extra for same-day or next-day delivery compared to truly free shipping for an item showing up in two days; the shoppers figure out the value equation that matters to them. But will competing retailers take advantage of the solution that Amazon is providing to them?