Posts Tagged 'Whole Foods'

Are “food halls” an answer for mall vacancies?

One of the biggest issues confronting mall developers is how to fill empty space (especially from vacant anchors). There just aren’t enough brick-and-mortar retailers to fill that space without coming up with some original ideas. One recent discussion on RetailWire focuses on the concept of “food halls” as a possible answer:

Anybody who has traveled the world (and has visited department stores in the process) can’t help but be dazzled by the food halls, especially in Europe but also in Asia and elsewhere. I realize that this is an extension of “high street” shopping in densely populated central business districts, so it doesn’t necessarily lend itself to the American department store model. And yet…wouldn’t a food hall (in the European sense) be more compelling than a Backstage installation in a Macy’s store?

The growth in self-contained food halls inside malls (but not necessarily inside a department store) is healthy for several reasons — and not just as a placeholder for another anchor tenant. It capitalizes on shoppers’ growing interest in cooking, healthy eating, locavore dining, etc. — and it provides an opportunity for retailers like Whole Foods/365 or Trader Joe’s to expand their footprint. Besides, if you’re waiting for one department store to fill the anchor space of another…you’re going to have a long wait.

Case in point (from another recent post):

“Signs of the apocalypse” are rampant in some segments, such as traditional mall anchors, but overstated in other high-growth areas like off-pricers. As regional malls suffer one tenant loss after another, it’s hard to see how all of those giant locations are going to be filled — especially if the anchors were in B and C malls to begin with.

One example, in my home market of Milwaukee, is the exit of Sears (three locations) followed by last week’s announced liquidation of Bon-Ton Stores. Boston Store (the local Bon-Ton nameplate) had five locations here — including two stores with over 200,000 square feet. If you’re a mall developer losing two of three anchors, it’s easy to feel like you have a black cloud hanging over your head.

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What’s the biggest obstacle to online grocery delivery?

My short answer (see RetailWire comment below): Execution!

If my experience (recounted on earlier posts) is any guide, too many shoppers have tried online grocery delivery with inconsistent results. It doesn’t inspire confidence when your delivery is two hours late and 33% short — and you’re on hold for 45 minutes trying to resolve the problem or cancel the order. (I’m talking about you, Safeway.)

There is no way for conventional grocers to grow their mature business without figuring out how to execute better. The customer has been trained to expect on-time delivery of complete orders in every other category, and Amazon is going to put pressure on its competitors as it expands the Whole Foods footprint.

About that “whole paycheck” perception…

Some of my earlier comments about the Amazon-Whole Foods deal touch on the expected benefits of better e-commerce execution and predictive data science. But let’s not forget that Whole Foods has a price perception problem that Amazon needs to fix. Here’s a recent comment from RetailWire:

I teach a college-level class in retail management. When I surveyed the class about where they shopped, most answered Aldi, or Trader Joe’s, or Metro Market (the Milwaukee brand of Kroger-owned Mariano’s). None of them shops at Whole Foods even though the store is in the neighborhood where most of them live.

There is no doubt that Whole Foods’ “premium price” reputation has kept many shoppers away, as they face more competition in the “organic” arena. I believe the first round of price cuts is just the start, and it simply moved some overpriced key items to the “market price.” Expect more of this from Amazon in the future, but also expect Amazon to build Whole Foods’ base on its potential e-commerce and home delivery upsides.

Amazon pushes Whole Foods toward centralization

There has been plenty of comment — most of it critical — about Amazon’s intention to centralize its merchandising of the Whole Foods stores. Most of the critics are concerned that the lack of local brand advocacy will turn Whole Foods into something very different. Here’s my RetailWire comment on that topic, followed by a comment about what Kroger is doing in response:

Centralized buying will bring economies of scale that allow Whole Foods to compete more effectively on price and on execution. But competitors (Kroger, I believe, is one example) are already opening the door to local vendors in response to the Whole Foods move.

Let’s not forget, however, that Amazon is the master of data science when it comes to retail management. Just because they are tightening the screws on the buying process doesn’t mean that they will ignore local preferences. In fact, they are likely to do a better job of allocating space and replenishing goods to meet individual stores’ tastes than Whole Foods ever dreamed of.

And now my comment about Kroger’s announcement that it is encouraging more local vendors:

Whether this was a pre-existing strategy or a reaction to the Whole Foods “centralization” news, it’s a good idea especially for grocers with national scale to pay attention to local preferences. As I said last week, however, don’t assume that Amazon will ignore this issue just because it is trying to find cost savings in the Whole Foods model in order to compete.

Amazon is the leader in using data science to determine consumer preferences, and I expect this to extend to their assortment planning in individual Whole Foods stores. If Kroger intends to compete, it will want to support its “local” initiative with great execution of in-stock levels.

 

Amazon and Kohl’s in a “smart home” alliance

Amazon and Kohl’s announced jointly that they are setting up “smart home” shops in 10 test stores in Chicago and Los Angeles this fall, using 1000 square feet to promote items like Echo along with related devices and the home services to set them up. Reportedly (according to RetailWire) the shops will be staffed by Amazon and the revenue will accrue to them. Here’s my comment:

A ten-store test in an 1100-store chain is not significant in the short term, but it’s an interesting alliance. (My usual full disclosure: I worked for Kohl’s between 1982 and 2006.) It’s curious that the sales revenue goes straight to Amazon (with a presumed piece of the action to Kohl’s), compared to the traditional model where somebody walks into the store and uses his/her Kohl’s card to buy an Echo Dot. It’s also a recognition that the “smart home” business needs more hands-on salesmanship.

Amazon look like the winner in this deal, because it potentially leads to another brick-and-mortar tie-up with a much bigger store footprint than Whole Foods, without the cost of a flat-out acquisition. Meanwhile, Kohl’s benefits from increased traffic and a meaningful use of space at a time when it is “right-sizing” about half of its stores. This bears watching.

More on combating the Amazon grocery juggernaut

Another timely discussion at RetailWire about the best ways for grocers to fight the Amazon-Whole Foods tie-up. To me, it’s not just about price competition but a lot more:

Most of the spotlight on the Amazon/Whole Foods acquisition has focused on price cutting, but these were necessary to make WF more competitive. Look for more cuts to come, to help Whole Foods overcome its “Whole Paycheck” brand reputation.

But longtime observers of Amazon know that the keys to its success are its assortments and its mastery of logistics. If I were a competitor, this is where I would focus my efforts before being run over by the Amazon juggernaut. Improving the efficiency of the shopping experience — whether through faster checkout, better execution of home delivery or higher in-stock rates — will go a long way toward dealing with the looming challenge.

“Whole Paycheck” no more

As soon as Amazon closed the deal on its Whole Foods acquisition, it dropped prices on several best-selling staples (with more to come). This sent a shudder through the rest of the grocery industry, especially with Amazon’s history of losing money to gain market share. I argue (on RetailWire) that Amazon had to move fast to overcome Whole Foods’ perception as an overpriced place to buy groceries:

I did a fast price check at the site for Metro Market (one of the Kroger’s divisions operating here in Milwaukee, and the sister brand of Mariano’s in Chicago). Its prices on organic bananas, eggs, butter and Fuji apples are already at or slightly below the new pricing at Whole Foods. (Its price on lean ground beef is 50 cents higher as of this morning.) What this points out is that Whole Foods had a pricing problem (“Whole Paycheck”) that Amazon is taking aggressive steps to correct.

Based on what happened to Costco’s and Walmart’s stock prices since Friday, there is a typical overreaction to the steps that Amazon is taking. Just keep in mind that Walmart and many other grocers are already competitive and Whole Foods is just joining the party. Also keep in mind that the Whole Foods brick-and-mortar footprint has a long way to go before it catches up with its competitors, despite the smart moves that Amazon is likely to make.


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