Archive Page 2

Why would IKEA sell its goods on Amazon?

RetailWire panelists engaged in some speculation that IKEA may begin expanding its e-commerce footprint, including selling some of its products on the Amazon Marketplace. Here’s my rationale for the possible decision:

IKEA continues to open physical stores at a very deliberate pace. Here in the Milwaukee area, they are finally breaking ground this month for a store announced last year and opening in 2018 — their first in the market. Yet IKEA has broad name recognition and brand equity among potential customers who don’t live anywhere near one of their stores. Why not expand their e-commerce footprint, especially if the sales data uncovers potential new markets or localized changes in merchandise mix?

Does Gordmans have a future as an off-pricer?

Stage Stores bought the Gordmans Midwest-based chain out of bankruptcy earlier this year, and announced plans to convert it from a promotional department store to an off-pricer. I commented on a RetailWire panel discussion about the game plan along with Stage Stores’ decision to maintain multiple nameplates:

From my recollection shoppoing a few Gordmans stores in the past, they were a Kohl’s wannabe without the geographic footprint to be sustainable. Now they are aiming to be a TJ Maxx wannabe but will still be saddled with the same problems. It’s tough to enter an increasingly crowded sector without the physical footprint or the buying power to compete against TJX, Ross Store and now Backstage.

Stage Stores is trying to maintain multiple concepts and brands (Peebles, Goodys, Bealls and now Gordman). Why not operate one concept under one brand-name umbrella? It’s the “Bon Ton syndrome” where none of the individual brand names is strong enough to overcome the lack of scale.

Changing of the guard at J. Crew

The decision by longtime J. Crew CEO Mickey Drexler to step aside was widely reported yesterday. (I recently discussed the departure of the company’s creative director.) Drexler is being replaced by James Brett, current president of the West Elm lifestyle brand. RetailWire panelists discussed what to anticipate at J. Crew, and I wrote the following:

First, keep in mind that Mickey Drexler is not exactly riding into the sunset: He retains his chairman title and a significant ownership in the company. So it remains to be seen whether Mr. Brett has the freedom to reshape the company as much as it needs. It’s not always easy for somebody with Mr. Drexler’s track record to walk away.

As to the reshaping, I expect to see a few things happen: First, a faster expansion of the Madewell business. Second, a course correction for the J. Crew brand itself, perhaps back to its legacy positioning as a more affordable (but still aspirational) alternative to Ralph Lauren. (Right now it’s nowhere close to a clear point of view.) And, third, expanding the J. Crew brand (once it is fixed) into new categories, just as Mr. Brett has done by treating West Elm as a lifestyle business.

Operations management needs a seat at the omnichannel table

Today’s RetailWire discussion focuses on the operating pressures caused by omnichannel and digital initiatives. Field managers absolutely need to be part of the planning process, and here’s my point of view:

Retailers pushing for omnichannel solutions (BOPIS, ship-from-store and so forth) absolutely have to involve store operations. There is no way to plan the costs of these services (especially in payroll hours) without field management at the table. And store management has a responsibility to speak up when pushed to “do more with less” — otherwise the costs of omnichannel programs erode the customer service that brick-and-mortar shoppers still expect.

Should Amazon buy Macy’s?

Here are some of my own thoughts from a provocative discussion on RetailWire:

Amazon shouldn’t buy Macy’s if its only motivation is to use the stores as pickup and return centers. And I’m not sure that Amazon “needs” Macy’s to give its own apparel business more credibility — some reports suggest that Amazon will already become the #1 seller of apparel in the U.S. this year.

It should only pursue Macy’s if it is prepared to reinvent the department store model from top to bottom — something that Macy’s itself seems unwilling or unable to do. Amazon is already dipping its toe into other kinds of brick-and-mortar retail, but this would be a big jump.

Are off-pricers bulletproof?

Off-pricers represent the hottest segment of brick-and-mortar retail right now, even more so than “fast fashion” retailers. RetailWire panelists discussed whether they are invulnerable to challenge, especially in a soft demand cycle for apparel. Here’s my point of view:

The “wheel of retailing” is a longstanding premise that new formats overtake old ones….only to be overtaken themselves when a newer innovation comes along. Off-pricers are playing a hot hand right now: Customers like the values and the “treasure hunt,” However, the category runs the risk of oversaturation even though the segment is gaining apparel share at the expense of more traditional models, and it faces the ongoing competitive threat of e-commerce.

Given all of this, hats off to TJX for continuing to develop new formats (especially in the home store) as one way to inoculate itself against these challenges.

Is there a market for “ultra-fast” fashion?

RetailWire panelists weighed in on the growing trend toward “ultra-fast” fashion. If the short lead times of fast fashion retailers (think Zara) aren’t short enough, how about two to four weeks from concept to delivery? And what sacrifices need to happen as a result? Here’s my comment:

Retailers have been too slow reacting to the fast-fashion capability of companies like Zara and Forever 21. These two companies (and a few others) have brought great supply chain management and data science to the art of getting relevant product to their customers quickly. But the key word here is “relevant”: Does a two-week lead time offer enough chance to test and reorder in depth?

Cost is another factor: Ultra-fast retailers will probably have to pay a premium for manufacturing labor close to their stores (especially in the U.S.), even if there is some offsetting saving on transportation. Fast turnaround makes sense if your store needs Stanley Cup championship jerseys tomorrow, but for the majority of goods a little extra time is worth the investment.