Can The Gap make its own luck?

After the CEO of Gap mentioned the lack of a fashion trend as part of his company’s sales problems, I posted the following (late in 2016) to RetailWire:

To blame soft sales on “lack of a trend” fails to recognize the retailer’s responsibility to help create those trends. Back in the Drexler-led heyday of The Gap, the company helped create the khaki phenomenon by getting behind the item in a huge way and by marketing it on TV as a must-have wardrobe item. The same principle applied to many other items in the store — from my days merchandising handbags, I remember a canvas tote in a bunch of colors that the industry dubbed “the Gap Bag.”

It sounds like Gap is suffering from the suffocating influence of both its creative direction and its data science, making it hard for entrepreneurial spirit to thrive among its merchants. (And it also looks like Gap has been slower to embrace the short-cycle, high-turnover model of its fast fashion competitors.) Gut feeling can still work wonders to drive sales, if a retailer has the courage to react quickly to big ideas.

And (upon further review) some more thoughts as Gap released its 2016 earnings in February:

One quarter doesn’t make a trend, but the 2% gain compares favorably to most of Gap’s competitors. In terms of merchandise content, there seems to be a renewed focus on what I would call “core basics,” which is what brought such success to Gap during the 90’s. Without ignoring the lessons of fast fashion retailers (especially in terms of speed to market and supply chain management), Gap will probably continue to gain traction if it takes a more classic approach to the business.

 

 

 

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