Target’s continued struggles with groceries and supply chain

I’ve combined a couple of recent RetailWire comments here — first about changes at the top of Target’s grocery business, and second about new hires on the logistics front — to reflect my concern that the company continues to have problems executing. First, about food:

It’s hard to judge Ms. Dament’s performance based on less than 18 months on the job and the possibly insurmountable challenge she faces. Maybe she underperformed, maybe it was a bad cultural fit or strategic clash –who knows? Anybody trying to turn this around quickly has not been dealt a winning hand.

Brian Cornell wrote off the Target Canada fiasco very quickly, but I’m not sure he can walk away from the grocery business so easily. The company spent billions on remodels and infrastructure to establish the business, and it doesn’t appear to have a replacement strategy waiting in the wings.

But how does Target fix it? It’s not a “top of mind” business and doesn’t have the critical mass needed to draw weekly shoppers. Perhaps Target should hire somebody from a more disruptive grocer (think Aldi or Trader Joe’s) who can offer up a more innovative, curated approach to the category.

Second, about logistics:

I’m no expert on supply chain management, but it’s clear that Target recognizes a logistics problem when it hires executives from two of the best in the business — first Amazon and now Walmart. I also don’t know whether Target has spent competitively over the years on logistics (compared to its competitors) but this is a longstanding issue. One of the biggest problems that doomed Target Canada was its inability to keep the store shelves filled, and anybody who shops Target regularly sees plenty of empty pegs on a regular basis.

Target has long pushed the idea of inventory turnover at the expense of satisfactory in-stock rates. If their new hires can accomplish both goals, more power to them….but the company needs to commit to higher service levels first, not just more speed and lower cost.

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